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Counters for Palmer’s Brigade, the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, IV Corps of the Army of the Potomac.  This completes Casey’s Division.  As before, I’m letting fate decide the Brigade’s morale with two minor changes:  the 81st NY I’m giving a +1 to their determination (good) and the 98th a -1 (bad).  This has to do with the ratio of killed / wounded casualties to all casualties (which included stragglers and captures) from the battle.  The 81st was above average and the 98th below.
I also calculated the strengths for this brigade differently than the others I’ve posted.  In his report of the battle, General I.N. Palmer states that he had about 1200 men with 400 on picket duty.  And that furthermore, the casualties he suffered amounted to nearly 1/4 based on his total strength and the killed / wounded number or nearly 1/3 based on his total strength and his aggregate casualties.
One data point I had came late:  A book on the history of Clinton and Franklin Counties (NY) had a fairly complete account of the battle.  In general, New York regiments don’t bother with separate regimental histories.  This is probably due to the work of Phisterer in compiling sketches of each.  However, this book describes the 98th Regiment’s role and pegs their strength at 385 men at the start.
Otherwise, the process was fairly straightforward:  Take the 1200 men mentioned, subtract out the 385 from the 98th and determine the estimated strength based on the two percentages noted above (after accounting for that regiment’s percentages as well).  As for the pickets, I simply took the 400 men and allocated them based on the ratio of each regiment’s strength to the original 1200.
The end result is, I believe, an accurate depiction of the brigade’s strength. 
One final word is needed about Palmer:  For a general, he sure was a whiner.  In two sections of his report, he disavows responsibility for the state of his brigade, laying blame on others.  I didn’t come across any official censures, but his buck passing is something.Counters for Palmer’s Brigade, the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, IV Corps of the Army of the Potomac.  This completes Casey’s Division.  As before, I’m letting fate decide the Brigade’s morale with two minor changes:  the 81st NY I’m giving a +1 to their determination (good) and the 98th a -1 (bad).  This has to do with the ratio of killed / wounded casualties to all casualties (which included stragglers and captures) from the battle.  The 81st was above average and the 98th below.
I also calculated the strengths for this brigade differently than the others I’ve posted.  In his report of the battle, General I.N. Palmer states that he had about 1200 men with 400 on picket duty.  And that furthermore, the casualties he suffered amounted to nearly 1/4 based on his total strength and the killed / wounded number or nearly 1/3 based on his total strength and his aggregate casualties.
One data point I had came late:  A book on the history of Clinton and Franklin Counties (NY) had a fairly complete account of the battle.  In general, New York regiments don’t bother with separate regimental histories.  This is probably due to the work of Phisterer in compiling sketches of each.  However, this book describes the 98th Regiment’s role and pegs their strength at 385 men at the start.
Otherwise, the process was fairly straightforward:  Take the 1200 men mentioned, subtract out the 385 from the 98th and determine the estimated strength based on the two percentages noted above (after accounting for that regiment’s percentages as well).  As for the pickets, I simply took the 400 men and allocated them based on the ratio of each regiment’s strength to the original 1200.
The end result is, I believe, an accurate depiction of the brigade’s strength. 
One final word is needed about Palmer:  For a general, he sure was a whiner.  In two sections of his report, he disavows responsibility for the state of his brigade, laying blame on others.  I didn’t come across any official censures, but his buck passing is something.

Counters for Palmer’s Brigade, the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, IV Corps of the Army of the Potomac.  This completes Casey’s Division.  As before, I’m letting fate decide the Brigade’s morale with two minor changes:  the 81st NY I’m giving a +1 to their determination (good) and the 98th a -1 (bad).  This has to do with the ratio of killed / wounded casualties to all casualties (which included stragglers and captures) from the battle.  The 81st was above average and the 98th below.

I also calculated the strengths for this brigade differently than the others I’ve posted.  In his report of the battle, General I.N. Palmer states that he had about 1200 men with 400 on picket duty.  And that furthermore, the casualties he suffered amounted to nearly 1/4 based on his total strength and the killed / wounded number or nearly 1/3 based on his total strength and his aggregate casualties.

One data point I had came late:  A book on the history of Clinton and Franklin Counties (NY) had a fairly complete account of the battle.  In general, New York regiments don’t bother with separate regimental histories.  This is probably due to the work of Phisterer in compiling sketches of each.  However, this book describes the 98th Regiment’s role and pegs their strength at 385 men at the start.

Otherwise, the process was fairly straightforward:  Take the 1200 men mentioned, subtract out the 385 from the 98th and determine the estimated strength based on the two percentages noted above (after accounting for that regiment’s percentages as well).  As for the pickets, I simply took the 400 men and allocated them based on the ratio of each regiment’s strength to the original 1200.

The end result is, I believe, an accurate depiction of the brigade’s strength. 

One final word is needed about Palmer:  For a general, he sure was a whiner.  In two sections of his report, he disavows responsibility for the state of his brigade, laying blame on others.  I didn’t come across any official censures, but his buck passing is something.



  1. zhodanius posted this