Electronic_Attic

The way I figure it, there are four basic elements to a wargame:
1.  Counters
2.  Map
3.  Rules
4.  Scenarios
I’ve been working exclusively on the counters and maps for the past seven months.  However, as I’ve been doing so, I’ve been thinking about rules that will follow from some of them.  As I’ve been working on the Union Counters lately, I came across information that several regiments embedded separate sharpshooter companies.  These sharpshooters had some amazing weaponry for the time:  Rifles with telescopic sights!  Breechloaders!  Repeaters!
It would be interesting and fun to allow these units to stand on their own and affect the battle.  After researching them in more detail, I started thinking about rules to handle these units.  The above graphic is my attempt to do so.
This is my first addition to the rules for the Great Battles of the American Civil War series (GBACW) originally developed by Richard Berg.  I’m amazed how a seemingly minor rule can be so long! View Larger

The way I figure it, there are four basic elements to a wargame:

1.  Counters

2.  Map

3.  Rules

4.  Scenarios

I’ve been working exclusively on the counters and maps for the past seven months.  However, as I’ve been doing so, I’ve been thinking about rules that will follow from some of them.  As I’ve been working on the Union Counters lately, I came across information that several regiments embedded separate sharpshooter companies.  These sharpshooters had some amazing weaponry for the time:  Rifles with telescopic sights!  Breechloaders!  Repeaters!

It would be interesting and fun to allow these units to stand on their own and affect the battle.  After researching them in more detail, I started thinking about rules to handle these units.  The above graphic is my attempt to do so.

This is my first addition to the rules for the Great Battles of the American Civil War series (GBACW) originally developed by Richard Berg.  I’m amazed how a seemingly minor rule can be so long!