Electronic_Attic

One of the things I enjoy about designing The Devil’s Own Fun is that I can take diversions in what I’m working on.  If I don’t feel like doing Order of Battle research, I’ll work on the maps.  If I don’t want to do either, I’ll lay out scenario information.
Lately, I’ve gotten very interested in line-of-sight (LOS) issues with the game.  It’s got a combination of 40-foot elevations, ridges, slopes, buildings and woods.  All of which have an impact on whether one unit can see another.
The traditional LOS process for the Great Battles of the Civil War (GBACW) uses what is essentially specially labeled graph paper.
I thought about doing something similar, but I’ve never been happy with the way you don’t get an accurate cross section because it’s too difficult to determine the proportion of terrain that’s under various hexes along the LOS.
Since I have some programming knowledge and experience, I decided to use my knowledge to build a tool that would let me see whether any two points on the map are able to see each other.
The first step was to populate it with information from the map.  I initially tried it with the full-sized map and wrote a simple program that scanned through each x and y point reading the color from the “elevation” layer of the GIMP file. This didn’t work because the function I used only read visible pixels and most of them were off the screen. So I resized the map to 42% which was big enough to provide detail but small enough to allow everything to fit on my screen. This created a database 1100 x 1000 pixels or just over 1,100,000 records. I did the same thing for the other “topographic” layers of the map:
Woods: 30 feet
Buildings: 20 feet
Slopes: +10 feet
Ridges: + 25 feet
Infantry / Artillery: 5 feet
Cavalry: 10 feet
Once the pixels were stored, it was a simple process to store each additional height and flag the type of terrain represented by it.
Next, I tested clicking on the map and setting the x/y starting and ending points and using these points to calculate the information needed to determine the equation of the line that would connect them. The equation of a line is:
y = mx + b
where m is the slope and b is the y-intercept (where the line crosses the y-axis). I also had to calculate the distance between the starting and ending points.
To generate the terrain cross-section, I ran the line through a transformation to rotate it from the angle shown to horizontal so I could overlay another window with the terrain height and the height of the elements on it.
The final step was to determine if the line connecting the starting and ending points crossed any of the pixels along the cross-section. This relied again on calculating the components of the line equation and for each x-axis value determining whether the height of the line was greater than the height of the base terrain and the terrain overlaid on it.
If any pixel of the connecting line was blocked, then the LOS was blocked and the window would display “BLOCKED” while if it wasn’t, the window would display “CLEAR.”One of the things I enjoy about designing The Devil’s Own Fun is that I can take diversions in what I’m working on.  If I don’t feel like doing Order of Battle research, I’ll work on the maps.  If I don’t want to do either, I’ll lay out scenario information.
Lately, I’ve gotten very interested in line-of-sight (LOS) issues with the game.  It’s got a combination of 40-foot elevations, ridges, slopes, buildings and woods.  All of which have an impact on whether one unit can see another.
The traditional LOS process for the Great Battles of the Civil War (GBACW) uses what is essentially specially labeled graph paper.
I thought about doing something similar, but I’ve never been happy with the way you don’t get an accurate cross section because it’s too difficult to determine the proportion of terrain that’s under various hexes along the LOS.
Since I have some programming knowledge and experience, I decided to use my knowledge to build a tool that would let me see whether any two points on the map are able to see each other.
The first step was to populate it with information from the map.  I initially tried it with the full-sized map and wrote a simple program that scanned through each x and y point reading the color from the “elevation” layer of the GIMP file. This didn’t work because the function I used only read visible pixels and most of them were off the screen. So I resized the map to 42% which was big enough to provide detail but small enough to allow everything to fit on my screen. This created a database 1100 x 1000 pixels or just over 1,100,000 records. I did the same thing for the other “topographic” layers of the map:
Woods: 30 feet
Buildings: 20 feet
Slopes: +10 feet
Ridges: + 25 feet
Infantry / Artillery: 5 feet
Cavalry: 10 feet
Once the pixels were stored, it was a simple process to store each additional height and flag the type of terrain represented by it.
Next, I tested clicking on the map and setting the x/y starting and ending points and using these points to calculate the information needed to determine the equation of the line that would connect them. The equation of a line is:
y = mx + b
where m is the slope and b is the y-intercept (where the line crosses the y-axis). I also had to calculate the distance between the starting and ending points.
To generate the terrain cross-section, I ran the line through a transformation to rotate it from the angle shown to horizontal so I could overlay another window with the terrain height and the height of the elements on it.
The final step was to determine if the line connecting the starting and ending points crossed any of the pixels along the cross-section. This relied again on calculating the components of the line equation and for each x-axis value determining whether the height of the line was greater than the height of the base terrain and the terrain overlaid on it.
If any pixel of the connecting line was blocked, then the LOS was blocked and the window would display “BLOCKED” while if it wasn’t, the window would display “CLEAR.”

One of the things I enjoy about designing The Devil’s Own Fun is that I can take diversions in what I’m working on.  If I don’t feel like doing Order of Battle research, I’ll work on the maps.  If I don’t want to do either, I’ll lay out scenario information.

Lately, I’ve gotten very interested in line-of-sight (LOS) issues with the game.  It’s got a combination of 40-foot elevations, ridges, slopes, buildings and woods.  All of which have an impact on whether one unit can see another.

The traditional LOS process for the Great Battles of the Civil War (GBACW) uses what is essentially specially labeled graph paper.

I thought about doing something similar, but I’ve never been happy with the way you don’t get an accurate cross section because it’s too difficult to determine the proportion of terrain that’s under various hexes along the LOS.

Since I have some programming knowledge and experience, I decided to use my knowledge to build a tool that would let me see whether any two points on the map are able to see each other.

The first step was to populate it with information from the map.  I initially tried it with the full-sized map and wrote a simple program that scanned through each x and y point reading the color from the “elevation” layer of the GIMP file. This didn’t work because the function I used only read visible pixels and most of them were off the screen. So I resized the map to 42% which was big enough to provide detail but small enough to allow everything to fit on my screen. This created a database 1100 x 1000 pixels or just over 1,100,000 records. I did the same thing for the other “topographic” layers of the map:

Woods: 30 feet

Buildings: 20 feet

Slopes: +10 feet

Ridges: + 25 feet

Infantry / Artillery: 5 feet

Cavalry: 10 feet

Once the pixels were stored, it was a simple process to store each additional height and flag the type of terrain represented by it.

Next, I tested clicking on the map and setting the x/y starting and ending points and using these points to calculate the information needed to determine the equation of the line that would connect them. The equation of a line is:

y = mx + b

where m is the slope and b is the y-intercept (where the line crosses the y-axis). I also had to calculate the distance between the starting and ending points.

To generate the terrain cross-section, I ran the line through a transformation to rotate it from the angle shown to horizontal so I could overlay another window with the terrain height and the height of the elements on it.

The final step was to determine if the line connecting the starting and ending points crossed any of the pixels along the cross-section. This relied again on calculating the components of the line equation and for each x-axis value determining whether the height of the line was greater than the height of the base terrain and the terrain overlaid on it.

If any pixel of the connecting line was blocked, then the LOS was blocked and the window would display “BLOCKED” while if it wasn’t, the window would display “CLEAR.”


solominiatures:

M26 Pershing completed. I had a bad mishap with the spray paint running due to humidity which necessitated resorting to some extreme weathering to save the model.

It came out great!  What’s the scale, and what did you put in the paint to provide the texturing?solominiatures:

M26 Pershing completed. I had a bad mishap with the spray paint running due to humidity which necessitated resorting to some extreme weathering to save the model.

It came out great!  What’s the scale, and what did you put in the paint to provide the texturing?solominiatures:

M26 Pershing completed. I had a bad mishap with the spray paint running due to humidity which necessitated resorting to some extreme weathering to save the model.

It came out great!  What’s the scale, and what did you put in the paint to provide the texturing?solominiatures:

M26 Pershing completed. I had a bad mishap with the spray paint running due to humidity which necessitated resorting to some extreme weathering to save the model.

It came out great!  What’s the scale, and what did you put in the paint to provide the texturing?solominiatures:

M26 Pershing completed. I had a bad mishap with the spray paint running due to humidity which necessitated resorting to some extreme weathering to save the model.

It came out great!  What’s the scale, and what did you put in the paint to provide the texturing?solominiatures:

M26 Pershing completed. I had a bad mishap with the spray paint running due to humidity which necessitated resorting to some extreme weathering to save the model.

It came out great!  What’s the scale, and what did you put in the paint to provide the texturing?solominiatures:

M26 Pershing completed. I had a bad mishap with the spray paint running due to humidity which necessitated resorting to some extreme weathering to save the model.

It came out great!  What’s the scale, and what did you put in the paint to provide the texturing?solominiatures:

M26 Pershing completed. I had a bad mishap with the spray paint running due to humidity which necessitated resorting to some extreme weathering to save the model.

It came out great!  What’s the scale, and what did you put in the paint to provide the texturing?solominiatures:

M26 Pershing completed. I had a bad mishap with the spray paint running due to humidity which necessitated resorting to some extreme weathering to save the model.

It came out great!  What’s the scale, and what did you put in the paint to provide the texturing?

solominiatures:

M26 Pershing completed. I had a bad mishap with the spray paint running due to humidity which necessitated resorting to some extreme weathering to save the model.


It came out great!  What’s the scale, and what did you put in the paint to provide the texturing?


Counters representing the entire Army of the Potomac.  All the units that were on the Peninsula in May 1862 or were supposed to head there (I’m looking at you, I Corps).  This represents:
114,700 soldiers
396 guns and 8,900 crew
12,600 cavalry
At this point, I figure there will be four counter sheets of Confederate units and 7 sheets of markers for a total of 16 sheets with 198 counters each.Counters representing the entire Army of the Potomac.  All the units that were on the Peninsula in May 1862 or were supposed to head there (I’m looking at you, I Corps).  This represents:
114,700 soldiers
396 guns and 8,900 crew
12,600 cavalry
At this point, I figure there will be four counter sheets of Confederate units and 7 sheets of markers for a total of 16 sheets with 198 counters each.Counters representing the entire Army of the Potomac.  All the units that were on the Peninsula in May 1862 or were supposed to head there (I’m looking at you, I Corps).  This represents:
114,700 soldiers
396 guns and 8,900 crew
12,600 cavalry
At this point, I figure there will be four counter sheets of Confederate units and 7 sheets of markers for a total of 16 sheets with 198 counters each.Counters representing the entire Army of the Potomac.  All the units that were on the Peninsula in May 1862 or were supposed to head there (I’m looking at you, I Corps).  This represents:
114,700 soldiers
396 guns and 8,900 crew
12,600 cavalry
At this point, I figure there will be four counter sheets of Confederate units and 7 sheets of markers for a total of 16 sheets with 198 counters each.Counters representing the entire Army of the Potomac.  All the units that were on the Peninsula in May 1862 or were supposed to head there (I’m looking at you, I Corps).  This represents:
114,700 soldiers
396 guns and 8,900 crew
12,600 cavalry
At this point, I figure there will be four counter sheets of Confederate units and 7 sheets of markers for a total of 16 sheets with 198 counters each.

Counters representing the entire Army of the Potomac.  All the units that were on the Peninsula in May 1862 or were supposed to head there (I’m looking at you, I Corps).  This represents:

114,700 soldiers

396 guns and 8,900 crew

12,600 cavalry

At this point, I figure there will be four counter sheets of Confederate units and 7 sheets of markers for a total of 16 sheets with 198 counters each.


Re-creating the Battle of Waterloo, with 250,000 6mm miniatures →

consimworld:

Tom Dunkel @ The Washington Post [watch video]

image image

20 years and only a few thousand soldiers to go!  Makes any obsessions of mine look tiny!


Counters for Shields’ Division of McDowell’s I Corps.  Shields took over when General Lander died in early 1862 of wounds suffered in an earlier battle.  Shields turned out to be a pretty decent general.  It was his Division that took on the fighting at Kernstown and handed Stonewall Jackson s surprise defeat.
Shields marched his men all over the Shenandoah Valley between March and June 1862.  According to Kimball, by the time they reached Luray in early June, the Division had marched 1150 miles in 43 days and had fought in one major and several minor battles.  The men’s uniforms and shoes were totally shot.
In fact, part of the reason why McDowell was not able to reinforce McClellan was due to the condition of this Division.  They reached the rest of the I Corps at Fredericksburg on 24 May 1862.  The plan was to march right away to link up.  However, following the review by Lincoln and Stanton, they concluded that they should all wait until 26 May 1862 to start marching.  This delay gave Jackson the opening he needed to defeat Banks and change Lincoln’s mind and send this Division back into the Valley. View Larger

Counters for Shields’ Division of McDowell’s I Corps.  Shields took over when General Lander died in early 1862 of wounds suffered in an earlier battle.  Shields turned out to be a pretty decent general.  It was his Division that took on the fighting at Kernstown and handed Stonewall Jackson s surprise defeat.

Shields marched his men all over the Shenandoah Valley between March and June 1862.  According to Kimball, by the time they reached Luray in early June, the Division had marched 1150 miles in 43 days and had fought in one major and several minor battles.  The men’s uniforms and shoes were totally shot.

In fact, part of the reason why McDowell was not able to reinforce McClellan was due to the condition of this Division.  They reached the rest of the I Corps at Fredericksburg on 24 May 1862.  The plan was to march right away to link up.  However, following the review by Lincoln and Stanton, they concluded that they should all wait until 26 May 1862 to start marching.  This delay gave Jackson the opening he needed to defeat Banks and change Lincoln’s mind and send this Division back into the Valley.


Counters for King’s Division of the I Corps of the Army of the Potomac (so many “ofs”).  Even though it’s been a while since I last posted, I’m still working on The Devil’s Own Fun.  But it follows the 80/20 rule that the first 80% takes 20% of the time and the remaining 20% takes 80% of the time.
The I Corps was supposed to head down to Richmond around Monday, May 26, 1862.  On Saturday the 24th, Lincoln reviewed the Corps with its 41,000 men, left impressed, got worried about Jackson’s movements towards DC and changed his orders for these troops the next day.
With this many soldiers, it’s obvious that Richmond would have fallen and the Civil War ended before the summer of 1862.  McDowell, the Corps commander wrote a letter to Lincoln expressing his concerns about being redirected but to no avail.
For his part, McClellan was convinced that McDowell had requested to not be sent in order to sabotage his efforts on the Peninsula.
This division includes the “Iron Brigade” and although they did not see much in the way of combat at this point, I’m assigning them all “A-level” morale in respect to what they were to soon become.  I could have given them a ?+, but that would have allowed C-level morale and that would not do.   View Larger

Counters for King’s Division of the I Corps of the Army of the Potomac (so many “ofs”).  Even though it’s been a while since I last posted, I’m still working on The Devil’s Own Fun.  But it follows the 80/20 rule that the first 80% takes 20% of the time and the remaining 20% takes 80% of the time.

The I Corps was supposed to head down to Richmond around Monday, May 26, 1862.  On Saturday the 24th, Lincoln reviewed the Corps with its 41,000 men, left impressed, got worried about Jackson’s movements towards DC and changed his orders for these troops the next day.

With this many soldiers, it’s obvious that Richmond would have fallen and the Civil War ended before the summer of 1862.  McDowell, the Corps commander wrote a letter to Lincoln expressing his concerns about being redirected but to no avail.

For his part, McClellan was convinced that McDowell had requested to not be sent in order to sabotage his efforts on the Peninsula.

This division includes the “Iron Brigade” and although they did not see much in the way of combat at this point, I’m assigning them all “A-level” morale in respect to what they were to soon become.  I could have given them a ?+, but that would have allowed C-level morale and that would not do.  


leskonley:

For the gamer nerds.  It’s what I played as a kid instead of Dungeons and Dragons, and required the use of your imagination to play.  I still have ALL my Traveller materials, though I probably shouldn’t admit that.

My friends and I were promiscuous gamers.  We played a ton of D&D and Traveller as well (still spell the word this way, too!).
I also have all my books including most of the JOTAS View Larger

leskonley:

For the gamer nerds.  It’s what I played as a kid instead of Dungeons and Dragons, and required the use of your imagination to play.  I still have ALL my Traveller materials, though I probably shouldn’t admit that.

My friends and I were promiscuous gamers.  We played a ton of D&D and Traveller as well (still spell the word this way, too!).

I also have all my books including most of the JOTAS


Counters for the Independent Brigades of McDowell’s I Corps.  There appear to have been three of these Brigades:  Doubleday’s, Geary’s and Bayard’s.
These are speculative units, because McDowell’s men were supposed to link up with McClellan’s forces in late May 1862 but were recalled to the Shenandoah Valley and the defense of Washington when Jackson made feints towards that city.
These three units had started to move south and were about 10 miles south of Fredericksburg on May 27th 1862.  Some of Bayard’s men claimed that they could hear the guns firing at the battle of Hanover Courthouse (Slash Church).  That’s how close they were.
It has long been speculated that had McDowell’s Corps been able to join the rest of the Army of the Potomac that they could have easily taken Richmond and ended the war in 1862. View Larger

Counters for the Independent Brigades of McDowell’s I Corps.  There appear to have been three of these Brigades:  Doubleday’s, Geary’s and Bayard’s.

These are speculative units, because McDowell’s men were supposed to link up with McClellan’s forces in late May 1862 but were recalled to the Shenandoah Valley and the defense of Washington when Jackson made feints towards that city.

These three units had started to move south and were about 10 miles south of Fredericksburg on May 27th 1862.  Some of Bayard’s men claimed that they could hear the guns firing at the battle of Hanover Courthouse (Slash Church).  That’s how close they were.

It has long been speculated that had McDowell’s Corps been able to join the rest of the Army of the Potomac that they could have easily taken Richmond and ended the war in 1862.