Electronic_Attic

Whew!  The final map for The Devil’s Own Fun!  I still have to go through the other maps and clean up various things, but this is the last major piece of a key element of the game.  All the pieces are:
Order of Battle (OOB) and Counters
Map of the Battlefield
Supplemental Rules to the Great Battles of the American Civil War Series (GBACW)
Scenarios
I’ve written some of the rules, I’ve listed all the scenarios I think could possibly be relevant and I’ve pretty much completed the OOB.  I need to review the units and information.  I also have to decide if I want to include the I Corps (McDowell’s men), who were supposed to link up with the rest of the Army of the Potomac but was retasked by Lincoln at the last minute. View Larger

Whew!  The final map for The Devil’s Own Fun!  I still have to go through the other maps and clean up various things, but this is the last major piece of a key element of the game.  All the pieces are:

Order of Battle (OOB) and Counters

Map of the Battlefield

Supplemental Rules to the Great Battles of the American Civil War Series (GBACW)

Scenarios

I’ve written some of the rules, I’ve listed all the scenarios I think could possibly be relevant and I’ve pretty much completed the OOB.  I need to review the units and information.  I also have to decide if I want to include the I Corps (McDowell’s men), who were supposed to link up with the rest of the Army of the Potomac but was retasked by Lincoln at the last minute.


Counters for McClellan’s Headquarters command present at the Battle of Seven Pines / Fair Oaks.  These units were stationed just north of the Chickahominy River near Coal Harbor (Cold Harbor), which, as noted on the bottom image consisted of a single house.
Many of the units had not seen combat to any real extent at this point.  Most of them were detachments of other units consisting of a company or battalion (several companies).
McClellan himself is given a command rating (all the leaders will, including Lee, Johnston and Smith) of only ”1” because he was suffering from malaria and did not venture out of his tent much.  He also was a very methodical and slow leader, preferring to wage a careful siege.  One thing he did do in preparation was to alert General Sumner to be ready to move on the 31st of May.
I’m also trying out other new counter images.  On this page, only the Infantry are still from the original game.  I’ve found new graphics for cavalry, supply, HQ, all the officers and artillery.  New units such as engineers, balloons and the coffee mill gun have their own graphics as well.  I’m searching for a replacement for the infantry.  If I can retain the flavor of the original game while using new renderings, it may simplify much, including any issues with image rights.Counters for McClellan’s Headquarters command present at the Battle of Seven Pines / Fair Oaks.  These units were stationed just north of the Chickahominy River near Coal Harbor (Cold Harbor), which, as noted on the bottom image consisted of a single house.
Many of the units had not seen combat to any real extent at this point.  Most of them were detachments of other units consisting of a company or battalion (several companies).
McClellan himself is given a command rating (all the leaders will, including Lee, Johnston and Smith) of only ”1” because he was suffering from malaria and did not venture out of his tent much.  He also was a very methodical and slow leader, preferring to wage a careful siege.  One thing he did do in preparation was to alert General Sumner to be ready to move on the 31st of May.
I’m also trying out other new counter images.  On this page, only the Infantry are still from the original game.  I’ve found new graphics for cavalry, supply, HQ, all the officers and artillery.  New units such as engineers, balloons and the coffee mill gun have their own graphics as well.  I’m searching for a replacement for the infantry.  If I can retain the flavor of the original game while using new renderings, it may simplify much, including any issues with image rights.Counters for McClellan’s Headquarters command present at the Battle of Seven Pines / Fair Oaks.  These units were stationed just north of the Chickahominy River near Coal Harbor (Cold Harbor), which, as noted on the bottom image consisted of a single house.
Many of the units had not seen combat to any real extent at this point.  Most of them were detachments of other units consisting of a company or battalion (several companies).
McClellan himself is given a command rating (all the leaders will, including Lee, Johnston and Smith) of only ”1” because he was suffering from malaria and did not venture out of his tent much.  He also was a very methodical and slow leader, preferring to wage a careful siege.  One thing he did do in preparation was to alert General Sumner to be ready to move on the 31st of May.
I’m also trying out other new counter images.  On this page, only the Infantry are still from the original game.  I’ve found new graphics for cavalry, supply, HQ, all the officers and artillery.  New units such as engineers, balloons and the coffee mill gun have their own graphics as well.  I’m searching for a replacement for the infantry.  If I can retain the flavor of the original game while using new renderings, it may simplify much, including any issues with image rights.

Counters for McClellan’s Headquarters command present at the Battle of Seven Pines / Fair Oaks.  These units were stationed just north of the Chickahominy River near Coal Harbor (Cold Harbor), which, as noted on the bottom image consisted of a single house.

Many of the units had not seen combat to any real extent at this point.  Most of them were detachments of other units consisting of a company or battalion (several companies).

McClellan himself is given a command rating (all the leaders will, including Lee, Johnston and Smith) of only ”1” because he was suffering from malaria and did not venture out of his tent much.  He also was a very methodical and slow leader, preferring to wage a careful siege.  One thing he did do in preparation was to alert General Sumner to be ready to move on the 31st of May.

I’m also trying out other new counter images.  On this page, only the Infantry are still from the original game.  I’ve found new graphics for cavalry, supply, HQ, all the officers and artillery.  New units such as engineers, balloons and the coffee mill gun have their own graphics as well.  I’m searching for a replacement for the infantry.  If I can retain the flavor of the original game while using new renderings, it may simplify much, including any issues with image rights.


Counters for Ingalls’ White House Command of the Advance Guard for the Army of the Potomac.  These units were stationed even farther to the east than this map can show.  White House was McClellan’s base.  It was where the Richmond and York River Rail Road ended (oddly enough) at the Pamunkey River.  White House was the estate owned by the widow Martha Custis’ family.  Martha met George Washington and became Martha Washington.  For a while, the house was protected, but it was eventually burned by the Union troops as they effected their “change of base” down to the James.
The 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry is given a new weapon type, “PC” because they were all armed with pistols, but only 10 men in each company (10%) were armed with Carbines.  The impact is that unlike “P” cavalry units, this one can fire two hexes instead of one and they get a minor bump in effectiveness at short range (x 1.5 vs. x 1).
I’m also playing with the idea of changing the standard icons used by the GBACW game for ones that are similar, but more dynamic and cleaner.  The Cavalry, Crew and Artillery units shown above are three of them.  I’m still looking for a replacement for the standard infantry rifleman. Counters for Ingalls’ White House Command of the Advance Guard for the Army of the Potomac.  These units were stationed even farther to the east than this map can show.  White House was McClellan’s base.  It was where the Richmond and York River Rail Road ended (oddly enough) at the Pamunkey River.  White House was the estate owned by the widow Martha Custis’ family.  Martha met George Washington and became Martha Washington.  For a while, the house was protected, but it was eventually burned by the Union troops as they effected their “change of base” down to the James.
The 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry is given a new weapon type, “PC” because they were all armed with pistols, but only 10 men in each company (10%) were armed with Carbines.  The impact is that unlike “P” cavalry units, this one can fire two hexes instead of one and they get a minor bump in effectiveness at short range (x 1.5 vs. x 1).
I’m also playing with the idea of changing the standard icons used by the GBACW game for ones that are similar, but more dynamic and cleaner.  The Cavalry, Crew and Artillery units shown above are three of them.  I’m still looking for a replacement for the standard infantry rifleman. Counters for Ingalls’ White House Command of the Advance Guard for the Army of the Potomac.  These units were stationed even farther to the east than this map can show.  White House was McClellan’s base.  It was where the Richmond and York River Rail Road ended (oddly enough) at the Pamunkey River.  White House was the estate owned by the widow Martha Custis’ family.  Martha met George Washington and became Martha Washington.  For a while, the house was protected, but it was eventually burned by the Union troops as they effected their “change of base” down to the James.
The 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry is given a new weapon type, “PC” because they were all armed with pistols, but only 10 men in each company (10%) were armed with Carbines.  The impact is that unlike “P” cavalry units, this one can fire two hexes instead of one and they get a minor bump in effectiveness at short range (x 1.5 vs. x 1).
I’m also playing with the idea of changing the standard icons used by the GBACW game for ones that are similar, but more dynamic and cleaner.  The Cavalry, Crew and Artillery units shown above are three of them.  I’m still looking for a replacement for the standard infantry rifleman. Counters for Ingalls’ White House Command of the Advance Guard for the Army of the Potomac.  These units were stationed even farther to the east than this map can show.  White House was McClellan’s base.  It was where the Richmond and York River Rail Road ended (oddly enough) at the Pamunkey River.  White House was the estate owned by the widow Martha Custis’ family.  Martha met George Washington and became Martha Washington.  For a while, the house was protected, but it was eventually burned by the Union troops as they effected their “change of base” down to the James.
The 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry is given a new weapon type, “PC” because they were all armed with pistols, but only 10 men in each company (10%) were armed with Carbines.  The impact is that unlike “P” cavalry units, this one can fire two hexes instead of one and they get a minor bump in effectiveness at short range (x 1.5 vs. x 1).
I’m also playing with the idea of changing the standard icons used by the GBACW game for ones that are similar, but more dynamic and cleaner.  The Cavalry, Crew and Artillery units shown above are three of them.  I’m still looking for a replacement for the standard infantry rifleman. 

Counters for Ingalls’ White House Command of the Advance Guard for the Army of the Potomac.  These units were stationed even farther to the east than this map can show.  White House was McClellan’s base.  It was where the Richmond and York River Rail Road ended (oddly enough) at the Pamunkey River.  White House was the estate owned by the widow Martha Custis’ family.  Martha met George Washington and became Martha Washington.  For a while, the house was protected, but it was eventually burned by the Union troops as they effected their “change of base” down to the James.

The 11th Pennsylvania Cavalry is given a new weapon type, “PC” because they were all armed with pistols, but only 10 men in each company (10%) were armed with Carbines.  The impact is that unlike “P” cavalry units, this one can fire two hexes instead of one and they get a minor bump in effectiveness at short range (x 1.5 vs. x 1).

I’m also playing with the idea of changing the standard icons used by the GBACW game for ones that are similar, but more dynamic and cleaner.  The Cavalry, Crew and Artillery units shown above are three of them.  I’m still looking for a replacement for the standard infantry rifleman. 


yoyolabsyourworld:

Generating City Maps from a Bitmap
As we’ve shown in our “Let’s Build” series on YouTube, it’s pretty simple to build a city in Your World. But it can still be time consuming if you are trying to create a really large city map the size that we have.
So one of the first things we did when creating our city was to make our lives a little bit easier by taking a few shortcuts.
To do this we created some additional functionality for our TileBuilder tool which would read in a colour coded bitmap image of a city design then translate it into buildings, roads, pavements and so on within the game.
Here’s how to do it…
Read More

Cool!  I’m going to have to take this method and see if I can repurpose it to read in the terrain maps for my game.  They’re actually much simpler than this, but much bigger. View Larger

yoyolabsyourworld:

Generating City Maps from a Bitmap

As we’ve shown in our “Let’s Build” series on YouTube, it’s pretty simple to build a city in Your World. But it can still be time consuming if you are trying to create a really large city map the size that we have.

So one of the first things we did when creating our city was to make our lives a little bit easier by taking a few shortcuts.

To do this we created some additional functionality for our TileBuilder tool which would read in a colour coded bitmap image of a city design then translate it into buildings, roads, pavements and so on within the game.

Here’s how to do it…

Read More

Cool!  I’m going to have to take this method and see if I can repurpose it to read in the terrain maps for my game.  They’re actually much simpler than this, but much bigger.


Counters for the Balloon Corps of “Professor” Thaddeus Lowe.  Lowe was quite a showman.  He was captured by the Rebels when his balloon landed near Fort Sumter in 1861.  At the time he was not a spy and he convinced them of that.  However, only a few months later he would be a spy for the Union.
Lowe impressed President Lincoln who authorized him to create an aeronautics unit.  Although assigned to the Army, he was not in any capacity in the Army and had to constantly fight for resources.
As can be seen here, Lowe had four balloons on the Peninsula:  Union, Constitution, Excelsior and the famous Intrepid.  During the campaign, the balloons went up hundreds of times.  They relayed information to the ground by signals as well as telegraph.  They acted as spotters for the artillery to suppress Confederate batteries.  Just having the balloons up in the air caused apprehension among the southerners.  One of their officers noted that, if nothing else, the balloons impacted the decision-making and movements of their troops.
During the battle of Seven Pines / Fair Oaks, Lowe and Park Hill observed the battle from above (as shown in the Currier & Ives print here), sending updates of the battle back to Fort Monroe and Washington.
Lowe was quite an inventor.  He developed a special wagon that used water, iron filings and sulphuric acid to generate hydrogen for his balloons.  The Confederacy had nothing like it.  Their balloon on the Peninsula was lifted by lamp gas and could only ascend to 500 feet or so compared to the 1000+ feet of Lowe’s balloons.
He had two stations at the end of May:  One at Mechanicsville and the other at Gaines’ Farm.  In the game, their impact will be to act as supplements to the artillery and to prevent surprise.

Counters for the Balloon Corps of “Professor” Thaddeus Lowe.  Lowe was quite a showman.  He was captured by the Rebels when his balloon landed near Fort Sumter in 1861.  At the time he was not a spy and he convinced them of that.  However, only a few months later he would be a spy for the Union.
Lowe impressed President Lincoln who authorized him to create an aeronautics unit.  Although assigned to the Army, he was not in any capacity in the Army and had to constantly fight for resources.
As can be seen here, Lowe had four balloons on the Peninsula:  Union, Constitution, Excelsior and the famous Intrepid.  During the campaign, the balloons went up hundreds of times.  They relayed information to the ground by signals as well as telegraph.  They acted as spotters for the artillery to suppress Confederate batteries.  Just having the balloons up in the air caused apprehension among the southerners.  One of their officers noted that, if nothing else, the balloons impacted the decision-making and movements of their troops.
During the battle of Seven Pines / Fair Oaks, Lowe and Park Hill observed the battle from above (as shown in the Currier & Ives print here), sending updates of the battle back to Fort Monroe and Washington.
Lowe was quite an inventor.  He developed a special wagon that used water, iron filings and sulphuric acid to generate hydrogen for his balloons.  The Confederacy had nothing like it.  Their balloon on the Peninsula was lifted by lamp gas and could only ascend to 500 feet or so compared to the 1000+ feet of Lowe’s balloons.
He had two stations at the end of May:  One at Mechanicsville and the other at Gaines’ Farm.  In the game, their impact will be to act as supplements to the artillery and to prevent surprise.

Counters for the Balloon Corps of “Professor” Thaddeus Lowe.  Lowe was quite a showman.  He was captured by the Rebels when his balloon landed near Fort Sumter in 1861.  At the time he was not a spy and he convinced them of that.  However, only a few months later he would be a spy for the Union.
Lowe impressed President Lincoln who authorized him to create an aeronautics unit.  Although assigned to the Army, he was not in any capacity in the Army and had to constantly fight for resources.
As can be seen here, Lowe had four balloons on the Peninsula:  Union, Constitution, Excelsior and the famous Intrepid.  During the campaign, the balloons went up hundreds of times.  They relayed information to the ground by signals as well as telegraph.  They acted as spotters for the artillery to suppress Confederate batteries.  Just having the balloons up in the air caused apprehension among the southerners.  One of their officers noted that, if nothing else, the balloons impacted the decision-making and movements of their troops.
During the battle of Seven Pines / Fair Oaks, Lowe and Park Hill observed the battle from above (as shown in the Currier & Ives print here), sending updates of the battle back to Fort Monroe and Washington.
Lowe was quite an inventor.  He developed a special wagon that used water, iron filings and sulphuric acid to generate hydrogen for his balloons.  The Confederacy had nothing like it.  Their balloon on the Peninsula was lifted by lamp gas and could only ascend to 500 feet or so compared to the 1000+ feet of Lowe’s balloons.
He had two stations at the end of May:  One at Mechanicsville and the other at Gaines’ Farm.  In the game, their impact will be to act as supplements to the artillery and to prevent surprise.

Counters for the Balloon Corps of “Professor” Thaddeus Lowe.  Lowe was quite a showman.  He was captured by the Rebels when his balloon landed near Fort Sumter in 1861.  At the time he was not a spy and he convinced them of that.  However, only a few months later he would be a spy for the Union.
Lowe impressed President Lincoln who authorized him to create an aeronautics unit.  Although assigned to the Army, he was not in any capacity in the Army and had to constantly fight for resources.
As can be seen here, Lowe had four balloons on the Peninsula:  Union, Constitution, Excelsior and the famous Intrepid.  During the campaign, the balloons went up hundreds of times.  They relayed information to the ground by signals as well as telegraph.  They acted as spotters for the artillery to suppress Confederate batteries.  Just having the balloons up in the air caused apprehension among the southerners.  One of their officers noted that, if nothing else, the balloons impacted the decision-making and movements of their troops.
During the battle of Seven Pines / Fair Oaks, Lowe and Park Hill observed the battle from above (as shown in the Currier & Ives print here), sending updates of the battle back to Fort Monroe and Washington.
Lowe was quite an inventor.  He developed a special wagon that used water, iron filings and sulphuric acid to generate hydrogen for his balloons.  The Confederacy had nothing like it.  Their balloon on the Peninsula was lifted by lamp gas and could only ascend to 500 feet or so compared to the 1000+ feet of Lowe’s balloons.
He had two stations at the end of May:  One at Mechanicsville and the other at Gaines’ Farm.  In the game, their impact will be to act as supplements to the artillery and to prevent surprise.

Counters for the Balloon Corps of “Professor” Thaddeus Lowe.  Lowe was quite a showman.  He was captured by the Rebels when his balloon landed near Fort Sumter in 1861.  At the time he was not a spy and he convinced them of that.  However, only a few months later he would be a spy for the Union.

Lowe impressed President Lincoln who authorized him to create an aeronautics unit.  Although assigned to the Army, he was not in any capacity in the Army and had to constantly fight for resources.

As can be seen here, Lowe had four balloons on the Peninsula:  Union, Constitution, Excelsior and the famous Intrepid.  During the campaign, the balloons went up hundreds of times.  They relayed information to the ground by signals as well as telegraph.  They acted as spotters for the artillery to suppress Confederate batteries.  Just having the balloons up in the air caused apprehension among the southerners.  One of their officers noted that, if nothing else, the balloons impacted the decision-making and movements of their troops.

During the battle of Seven Pines / Fair Oaks, Lowe and Park Hill observed the battle from above (as shown in the Currier & Ives print here), sending updates of the battle back to Fort Monroe and Washington.

Lowe was quite an inventor.  He developed a special wagon that used water, iron filings and sulphuric acid to generate hydrogen for his balloons.  The Confederacy had nothing like it.  Their balloon on the Peninsula was lifted by lamp gas and could only ascend to 500 feet or so compared to the 1000+ feet of Lowe’s balloons.

He had two stations at the end of May:  One at Mechanicsville and the other at Gaines’ Farm.  In the game, their impact will be to act as supplements to the artillery and to prevent surprise.


thecivilwarparlor:

Utah In The Civil War-Once the Civil War started, President Abraham Lincoln was concerned about preserving telegraph lines and the Overland Trail stagecoach and mail line in the West.
In the spring of 1862, Lincoln wired Utah leader Brigham Young and asked for volunteer soldiers to protect these paths of communication. As a result, a volunteer unit of the Nauvoo Legion led by Lot Smith — a Farmington livestock owner — was assigned to safeguard the trail and telegraph lines for 90 days.
There was irony in Smith’s assignment to work for the federal government, because a few years earlier, when Army troops were sent to Utah to suppress the alleged Mormon uprising, Smith was ordered by Brigham Young to thwart those soldiers’ entry into the state. Utah did boast a contingent of Civil War soldiers once the 3rd California Volunteer Infantry arrived in Salt Lake City in 1862.
Although some companies that belonged to this Union regiment served in California, others were dispatched to Utah territory to replace Lot Smith’s unit. The army first looked at moving into the site of the abandoned Camp Floyd, but decided instead to locate on the foothills overlooking the Salt Lake Valley. Led by Colonel Patrick Edward Connor, the army’s mission was to protect mail and shipping routes during the war. Gold that was being mined and shipped out of California at the time was important for helping to finance the Union cause. Also, some Californians were sympathetic to the South so Lincoln viewed mail and telegraph lines as vital to keeping communication open with the West. 
http://www.standard.net/topics/features/2011/06/05/civil-war-was-felt-utah-too
View Larger

thecivilwarparlor:

Utah In The Civil War-Once the Civil War started, President Abraham Lincoln was concerned about preserving telegraph lines and the Overland Trail stagecoach and mail line in the West.

In the spring of 1862, Lincoln wired Utah leader Brigham Young and asked for volunteer soldiers to protect these paths of communication. As a result, a volunteer unit of the Nauvoo Legion led by Lot Smith — a Farmington livestock owner — was assigned to safeguard the trail and telegraph lines for 90 days.

There was irony in Smith’s assignment to work for the federal government, because a few years earlier, when Army troops were sent to Utah to suppress the alleged Mormon uprising, Smith was ordered by Brigham Young to thwart those soldiers’ entry into the state. Utah did boast a contingent of Civil War soldiers once the 3rd California Volunteer Infantry arrived in Salt Lake City in 1862.

Although some companies that belonged to this Union regiment served in California, others were dispatched to Utah territory to replace Lot Smith’s unit. The army first looked at moving into the site of the abandoned Camp Floyd, but decided instead to locate on the foothills overlooking the Salt Lake Valley. Led by Colonel Patrick Edward Connor, the army’s mission was to protect mail and shipping routes during the war. Gold that was being mined and shipped out of California at the time was important for helping to finance the Union cause. Also, some Californians were sympathetic to the South so Lincoln viewed mail and telegraph lines as vital to keeping communication open with the West. 

http://www.standard.net/topics/features/2011/06/05/civil-war-was-felt-utah-too


Counters for Davidson’s Brigade (3rd) of the 2nd Division, VI Corps, Army of the Potomac.  They are another “speculative brigade.”
These are also the last Corps-assigned units for “The Devil’s Own Fun.”  There are still quite a number of units to research beyond this.  There’s the whole reserve, advance guard and headquarters.  Additionally, I’d like to include McDowell’s I Corps, since they were supposed to link up with the part of the Army that was on the north side of the Chickahominy.  This is why McClellan made the “mistake” of dividing his forces between such a significant military obstacle.  He didn’t want to do this, but Lincoln had promised him McDowell’s approximately 40,000 men.  In the end, they were recalled because Jackson was having lots of success in the Shenandoah Valley and Lincoln feared for Washington’s protection.
McDowell was set to head south on 24 May 1862.  At the same time, Davidson’s Brigade was tasked with clearing out Mechanicsville.  This is the same village that would see a huge battle in just another month’s time.  Coincidentally, the Mechanicsville map is the one I just finished as well (it’s my “Map Z” because I got all disordered in my layout).
Davidson’s men charged the confederates who were there and routed them.  The southerners crossed the Chickahominy and blew the Mechanicsville and New bridges.  The opposition was the 8th and 9th Georgia Regiments numbering 800 and 900 men as well as a Louisiana Artillery Battery and a squadron of Cavalry.  They were described as having “skedaddled” across the river.  One of the scenarios for TDoF will be this battle with this brigade on this map.
Although the bridges were destroyed, General Barnard reported that replacements were ready on 1 June 1862, so these men could have crossed and fought had McClellan been more engaged.Counters for Davidson’s Brigade (3rd) of the 2nd Division, VI Corps, Army of the Potomac.  They are another “speculative brigade.”
These are also the last Corps-assigned units for “The Devil’s Own Fun.”  There are still quite a number of units to research beyond this.  There’s the whole reserve, advance guard and headquarters.  Additionally, I’d like to include McDowell’s I Corps, since they were supposed to link up with the part of the Army that was on the north side of the Chickahominy.  This is why McClellan made the “mistake” of dividing his forces between such a significant military obstacle.  He didn’t want to do this, but Lincoln had promised him McDowell’s approximately 40,000 men.  In the end, they were recalled because Jackson was having lots of success in the Shenandoah Valley and Lincoln feared for Washington’s protection.
McDowell was set to head south on 24 May 1862.  At the same time, Davidson’s Brigade was tasked with clearing out Mechanicsville.  This is the same village that would see a huge battle in just another month’s time.  Coincidentally, the Mechanicsville map is the one I just finished as well (it’s my “Map Z” because I got all disordered in my layout).
Davidson’s men charged the confederates who were there and routed them.  The southerners crossed the Chickahominy and blew the Mechanicsville and New bridges.  The opposition was the 8th and 9th Georgia Regiments numbering 800 and 900 men as well as a Louisiana Artillery Battery and a squadron of Cavalry.  They were described as having “skedaddled” across the river.  One of the scenarios for TDoF will be this battle with this brigade on this map.
Although the bridges were destroyed, General Barnard reported that replacements were ready on 1 June 1862, so these men could have crossed and fought had McClellan been more engaged.Counters for Davidson’s Brigade (3rd) of the 2nd Division, VI Corps, Army of the Potomac.  They are another “speculative brigade.”
These are also the last Corps-assigned units for “The Devil’s Own Fun.”  There are still quite a number of units to research beyond this.  There’s the whole reserve, advance guard and headquarters.  Additionally, I’d like to include McDowell’s I Corps, since they were supposed to link up with the part of the Army that was on the north side of the Chickahominy.  This is why McClellan made the “mistake” of dividing his forces between such a significant military obstacle.  He didn’t want to do this, but Lincoln had promised him McDowell’s approximately 40,000 men.  In the end, they were recalled because Jackson was having lots of success in the Shenandoah Valley and Lincoln feared for Washington’s protection.
McDowell was set to head south on 24 May 1862.  At the same time, Davidson’s Brigade was tasked with clearing out Mechanicsville.  This is the same village that would see a huge battle in just another month’s time.  Coincidentally, the Mechanicsville map is the one I just finished as well (it’s my “Map Z” because I got all disordered in my layout).
Davidson’s men charged the confederates who were there and routed them.  The southerners crossed the Chickahominy and blew the Mechanicsville and New bridges.  The opposition was the 8th and 9th Georgia Regiments numbering 800 and 900 men as well as a Louisiana Artillery Battery and a squadron of Cavalry.  They were described as having “skedaddled” across the river.  One of the scenarios for TDoF will be this battle with this brigade on this map.
Although the bridges were destroyed, General Barnard reported that replacements were ready on 1 June 1862, so these men could have crossed and fought had McClellan been more engaged.Counters for Davidson’s Brigade (3rd) of the 2nd Division, VI Corps, Army of the Potomac.  They are another “speculative brigade.”
These are also the last Corps-assigned units for “The Devil’s Own Fun.”  There are still quite a number of units to research beyond this.  There’s the whole reserve, advance guard and headquarters.  Additionally, I’d like to include McDowell’s I Corps, since they were supposed to link up with the part of the Army that was on the north side of the Chickahominy.  This is why McClellan made the “mistake” of dividing his forces between such a significant military obstacle.  He didn’t want to do this, but Lincoln had promised him McDowell’s approximately 40,000 men.  In the end, they were recalled because Jackson was having lots of success in the Shenandoah Valley and Lincoln feared for Washington’s protection.
McDowell was set to head south on 24 May 1862.  At the same time, Davidson’s Brigade was tasked with clearing out Mechanicsville.  This is the same village that would see a huge battle in just another month’s time.  Coincidentally, the Mechanicsville map is the one I just finished as well (it’s my “Map Z” because I got all disordered in my layout).
Davidson’s men charged the confederates who were there and routed them.  The southerners crossed the Chickahominy and blew the Mechanicsville and New bridges.  The opposition was the 8th and 9th Georgia Regiments numbering 800 and 900 men as well as a Louisiana Artillery Battery and a squadron of Cavalry.  They were described as having “skedaddled” across the river.  One of the scenarios for TDoF will be this battle with this brigade on this map.
Although the bridges were destroyed, General Barnard reported that replacements were ready on 1 June 1862, so these men could have crossed and fought had McClellan been more engaged.

Counters for Davidson’s Brigade (3rd) of the 2nd Division, VI Corps, Army of the Potomac.  They are another “speculative brigade.”

These are also the last Corps-assigned units for “The Devil’s Own Fun.”  There are still quite a number of units to research beyond this.  There’s the whole reserve, advance guard and headquarters.  Additionally, I’d like to include McDowell’s I Corps, since they were supposed to link up with the part of the Army that was on the north side of the Chickahominy.  This is why McClellan made the “mistake” of dividing his forces between such a significant military obstacle.  He didn’t want to do this, but Lincoln had promised him McDowell’s approximately 40,000 men.  In the end, they were recalled because Jackson was having lots of success in the Shenandoah Valley and Lincoln feared for Washington’s protection.

McDowell was set to head south on 24 May 1862.  At the same time, Davidson’s Brigade was tasked with clearing out Mechanicsville.  This is the same village that would see a huge battle in just another month’s time.  Coincidentally, the Mechanicsville map is the one I just finished as well (it’s my “Map Z” because I got all disordered in my layout).

Davidson’s men charged the confederates who were there and routed them.  The southerners crossed the Chickahominy and blew the Mechanicsville and New bridges.  The opposition was the 8th and 9th Georgia Regiments numbering 800 and 900 men as well as a Louisiana Artillery Battery and a squadron of Cavalry.  They were described as having “skedaddled” across the river.  One of the scenarios for TDoF will be this battle with this brigade on this map.

Although the bridges were destroyed, General Barnard reported that replacements were ready on 1 June 1862, so these men could have crossed and fought had McClellan been more engaged.


Counters for Brooks’ Brigade (the First Vermont Brigade) of the 2nd Division VI Corps, Army of the Potomac.  This is another speculative Brigade that was north of the Chickahominy on the 31st of May at the Gaines’ Farm.
Also shown is their Brigade Combat Effectiveness grid.  They can suffer 50% casualties before losing effectiveness.  The BCE formula is a complex calculation based on each unit’s morale rating, their overall strength has a part of the brigade and the strength of their leaders compared to a “model” brigade.  By way of example, Sickles’ Brigade only has 27 strength points, but can also take 15 before losing effectiveness.
This Brigade was one of only a handful that were completely comprised of units from a single state.  The Excelsior Brigade is one as is the New Jersey Brigade.  In general, the practice was to split up regiments so that casualties would not impact a single state disproportionately.
The Vermonters also had a reputation as fantastic marchers.  In Anecdotes, poetry, and incidents of the war: North and South : 1860-1865, an outside observer noted that “they were undoubtedly the best brigade in the Army of the Potomac, for they not only fought as well as it was possible to fight, but they could outmarch, with the utmost east, any other organization in the army.”  It is for this reason that I’m going to give them an extra movement point in column formation (six vice five).
Finally, in reading the history of Vermont in the Civil War, I came across a footnote that made me think of the “Bixby Letter" so forcefully quoted in "Saving Private Ryan."  The Bixby letter was written to a mother of five boys all of whom were supposedly killed during the war.  However, it turns out that this wasn’t accurate as three of the brothers survived.
However, the Fifth Vermont lost 206 men out of 400 carried into battle at Savage’s Station during the Seven Days’ Battles.  Of these casualties, Company E lost five brothers from Manchester, VT (see both Vermont in the Civil War and Ranger95):
Cummings, Edmund M., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 23, enlisted 2/22/62, mustered in 4/12/62, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, mortally wounded in action, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, died of wounds 7/2/62
Cummings, Henry, credited to, Manchester, VT, age 38, enlisted 8/26/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, wounded, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, paroled 7/25/62, discharged because of wounds, 1/15/63
Cummings, Hiram P., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 29, enlisted 8/28/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62„ mortally wounded in action, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, died of wounds 7/7/62
Cummings, Silas A., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 20, enlisted 8/20/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62„ mortally wounded in action, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, died of wounds 7/4/62
Cummings, William H. H., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 22, enlisted 8/26/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, pr Corporal, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, paroled 7/17/63, died of wounds 8/2/62
Cummings, William H. H., credited to, Shrewsbury, VT, age 23, enlisted 8/18/64, mustered in 8/18/64, Pvt, Co. K, 9th Vermont Volunteer infantry, enlisted for one year, tr to 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, Co. E 1/20/65, mustered out 6/29/65
Additionally, Horace Clayton was a brother-in-law who was killed in that battle as well.  Of these seven, six were killed and Henry was severely wounded and discharged by special order of the Secretary of War.Counters for Brooks’ Brigade (the First Vermont Brigade) of the 2nd Division VI Corps, Army of the Potomac.  This is another speculative Brigade that was north of the Chickahominy on the 31st of May at the Gaines’ Farm.
Also shown is their Brigade Combat Effectiveness grid.  They can suffer 50% casualties before losing effectiveness.  The BCE formula is a complex calculation based on each unit’s morale rating, their overall strength has a part of the brigade and the strength of their leaders compared to a “model” brigade.  By way of example, Sickles’ Brigade only has 27 strength points, but can also take 15 before losing effectiveness.
This Brigade was one of only a handful that were completely comprised of units from a single state.  The Excelsior Brigade is one as is the New Jersey Brigade.  In general, the practice was to split up regiments so that casualties would not impact a single state disproportionately.
The Vermonters also had a reputation as fantastic marchers.  In Anecdotes, poetry, and incidents of the war: North and South : 1860-1865, an outside observer noted that “they were undoubtedly the best brigade in the Army of the Potomac, for they not only fought as well as it was possible to fight, but they could outmarch, with the utmost east, any other organization in the army.”  It is for this reason that I’m going to give them an extra movement point in column formation (six vice five).
Finally, in reading the history of Vermont in the Civil War, I came across a footnote that made me think of the “Bixby Letter" so forcefully quoted in "Saving Private Ryan."  The Bixby letter was written to a mother of five boys all of whom were supposedly killed during the war.  However, it turns out that this wasn’t accurate as three of the brothers survived.
However, the Fifth Vermont lost 206 men out of 400 carried into battle at Savage’s Station during the Seven Days’ Battles.  Of these casualties, Company E lost five brothers from Manchester, VT (see both Vermont in the Civil War and Ranger95):
Cummings, Edmund M., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 23, enlisted 2/22/62, mustered in 4/12/62, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, mortally wounded in action, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, died of wounds 7/2/62
Cummings, Henry, credited to, Manchester, VT, age 38, enlisted 8/26/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, wounded, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, paroled 7/25/62, discharged because of wounds, 1/15/63
Cummings, Hiram P., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 29, enlisted 8/28/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62„ mortally wounded in action, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, died of wounds 7/7/62
Cummings, Silas A., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 20, enlisted 8/20/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62„ mortally wounded in action, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, died of wounds 7/4/62
Cummings, William H. H., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 22, enlisted 8/26/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, pr Corporal, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, paroled 7/17/63, died of wounds 8/2/62
Cummings, William H. H., credited to, Shrewsbury, VT, age 23, enlisted 8/18/64, mustered in 8/18/64, Pvt, Co. K, 9th Vermont Volunteer infantry, enlisted for one year, tr to 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, Co. E 1/20/65, mustered out 6/29/65
Additionally, Horace Clayton was a brother-in-law who was killed in that battle as well.  Of these seven, six were killed and Henry was severely wounded and discharged by special order of the Secretary of War.

Counters for Brooks’ Brigade (the First Vermont Brigade) of the 2nd Division VI Corps, Army of the Potomac.  This is another speculative Brigade that was north of the Chickahominy on the 31st of May at the Gaines’ Farm.

Also shown is their Brigade Combat Effectiveness grid.  They can suffer 50% casualties before losing effectiveness.  The BCE formula is a complex calculation based on each unit’s morale rating, their overall strength has a part of the brigade and the strength of their leaders compared to a “model” brigade.  By way of example, Sickles’ Brigade only has 27 strength points, but can also take 15 before losing effectiveness.

This Brigade was one of only a handful that were completely comprised of units from a single state.  The Excelsior Brigade is one as is the New Jersey Brigade.  In general, the practice was to split up regiments so that casualties would not impact a single state disproportionately.

The Vermonters also had a reputation as fantastic marchers.  In Anecdotes, poetry, and incidents of the war: North and South : 1860-1865, an outside observer noted that “they were undoubtedly the best brigade in the Army of the Potomac, for they not only fought as well as it was possible to fight, but they could outmarch, with the utmost east, any other organization in the army.”  It is for this reason that I’m going to give them an extra movement point in column formation (six vice five).

Finally, in reading the history of Vermont in the Civil War, I came across a footnote that made me think of the “Bixby Letter" so forcefully quoted in "Saving Private Ryan."  The Bixby letter was written to a mother of five boys all of whom were supposedly killed during the war.  However, it turns out that this wasn’t accurate as three of the brothers survived.

However, the Fifth Vermont lost 206 men out of 400 carried into battle at Savage’s Station during the Seven Days’ Battles.  Of these casualties, Company E lost five brothers from Manchester, VT (see both Vermont in the Civil War and Ranger95):

Cummings, Edmund M., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 23, enlisted 2/22/62, mustered in 4/12/62, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, mortally wounded in action, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, died of wounds 7/2/62

Cummings, Henry, credited to, Manchester, VT, age 38, enlisted 8/26/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, wounded, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, paroled 7/25/62, discharged because of wounds, 1/15/63

Cummings, Hiram P., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 29, enlisted 8/28/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62„ mortally wounded in action, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, died of wounds 7/7/62

Cummings, Silas A., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 20, enlisted 8/20/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62„ mortally wounded in action, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, died of wounds 7/4/62

Cummings, William H. H., credited to, Manchester, VT, age 22, enlisted 8/26/61, mustered in 9/16/61, Pvt, Co. E, 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, pr Corporal, prisoner of war, Savage’s Station, 6/29/62, paroled 7/17/63, died of wounds 8/2/62

Cummings, William H. H., credited to, Shrewsbury, VT, age 23, enlisted 8/18/64, mustered in 8/18/64, Pvt, Co. K, 9th Vermont Volunteer infantry, enlisted for one year, tr to 5th Vermont Volunteer infantry, Co. E 1/20/65, mustered out 6/29/65

Additionally, Horace Clayton was a brother-in-law who was killed in that battle as well.  Of these seven, six were killed and Henry was severely wounded and discharged by special order of the Secretary of War.


Counters for Hancock’s Brigade of Smith’s Division, Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac (1 / 2 / VI).  This is another speculative brigade for The Devil’s own Fun.  They too, were on the North side of the Chickahominy and not engaged at all.  Unlike some of the other speculative brigades, this one was not even ordered to fall in to be ready to march.
They were not heavily engaged during much of the Peninsula Campaign, experiencing only light fighting and casualties until the Seven Days Battles.
I’ve included a picture of General Hancock and General Scott.  Hancock was named for General Scott (Winfield Scott Hancock).  Scott was a genuine national treasure / monument.  He was a Lieutenant General and had served as a General in three different wars.  At the start of the ACW, he was the General-in-Chief of the Army.  However, McClellan applied political pressure and forced him to resign this position after Ball’s Bluff.  McClellan took his place.  But in truth, beloved as he was, “Old Fuss and Feathers” was well beyond his prime at this point anyway.
Hancock would serve ably as a Division and Corps commander later in the war.Counters for Hancock’s Brigade of Smith’s Division, Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac (1 / 2 / VI).  This is another speculative brigade for The Devil’s own Fun.  They too, were on the North side of the Chickahominy and not engaged at all.  Unlike some of the other speculative brigades, this one was not even ordered to fall in to be ready to march.
They were not heavily engaged during much of the Peninsula Campaign, experiencing only light fighting and casualties until the Seven Days Battles.
I’ve included a picture of General Hancock and General Scott.  Hancock was named for General Scott (Winfield Scott Hancock).  Scott was a genuine national treasure / monument.  He was a Lieutenant General and had served as a General in three different wars.  At the start of the ACW, he was the General-in-Chief of the Army.  However, McClellan applied political pressure and forced him to resign this position after Ball’s Bluff.  McClellan took his place.  But in truth, beloved as he was, “Old Fuss and Feathers” was well beyond his prime at this point anyway.
Hancock would serve ably as a Division and Corps commander later in the war.Counters for Hancock’s Brigade of Smith’s Division, Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac (1 / 2 / VI).  This is another speculative brigade for The Devil’s own Fun.  They too, were on the North side of the Chickahominy and not engaged at all.  Unlike some of the other speculative brigades, this one was not even ordered to fall in to be ready to march.
They were not heavily engaged during much of the Peninsula Campaign, experiencing only light fighting and casualties until the Seven Days Battles.
I’ve included a picture of General Hancock and General Scott.  Hancock was named for General Scott (Winfield Scott Hancock).  Scott was a genuine national treasure / monument.  He was a Lieutenant General and had served as a General in three different wars.  At the start of the ACW, he was the General-in-Chief of the Army.  However, McClellan applied political pressure and forced him to resign this position after Ball’s Bluff.  McClellan took his place.  But in truth, beloved as he was, “Old Fuss and Feathers” was well beyond his prime at this point anyway.
Hancock would serve ably as a Division and Corps commander later in the war.

Counters for Hancock’s Brigade of Smith’s Division, Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac (1 / 2 / VI).  This is another speculative brigade for The Devil’s own Fun.  They too, were on the North side of the Chickahominy and not engaged at all.  Unlike some of the other speculative brigades, this one was not even ordered to fall in to be ready to march.

They were not heavily engaged during much of the Peninsula Campaign, experiencing only light fighting and casualties until the Seven Days Battles.

I’ve included a picture of General Hancock and General Scott.  Hancock was named for General Scott (Winfield Scott Hancock).  Scott was a genuine national treasure / monument.  He was a Lieutenant General and had served as a General in three different wars.  At the start of the ACW, he was the General-in-Chief of the Army.  However, McClellan applied political pressure and forced him to resign this position after Ball’s Bluff.  McClellan took his place.  But in truth, beloved as he was, “Old Fuss and Feathers” was well beyond his prime at this point anyway.

Hancock would serve ably as a Division and Corps commander later in the war.